Showing posts with label adult coloring books. Show all posts
Showing posts with label adult coloring books. Show all posts

Saturday, October 22, 2016

Hello, my name is Doris FUN

I haven't been on Polyvore for a few months.  I know eh, neglecting some of my favorites.  I got right on that today.  I came with the intention of gather ideas for my Halloween Costume this year.  

I think it's brilliant, but of course that's me.  I have dressed up for Halloween almost every year of my life, that is 55 years.  Well, at least the years that I could dress myself up.  Then again, I think my mom got into Halloween big time.  It isn't something we've talked about for a number of years.  

But, if memory serves me, I was in a parade (small town, small time) contest when I was about 6 or 7 years old.  I don't know the spiel, but it had something to do with a tribesman with dark makeup, grass skirt, a dressed up bicycle.  I'll have to go digging, or ask my mom if she has the photo still around.  Only probably is, it will take her about a year to find it, if ever.  Then my siblings, especially my brothers will get at me because they will find themselves in on the act, simply by association, and because they live close to my mom.  She will remind them daily, hourly, weekly, monthly to come help her search for that photo for Jeannette who is writing a book (my mom is a big fan of mine, and tends to exaggerate a bit.    I like to give her credit because it is interpretation from where I'm looking.)

 English is not my mom's first language and both her parents spoke in their own respective languages of Polish and Ukrainian.  A power struggle of sorts back in the day, where my poor mother, had to learn Polish and Ukrainian because both grandparents never spoke English.  On top of that, they never decided to speak one language in the home my mom grew up in.  My grandmother spoke Ukrainian and that was that.  My grandfather understood her but had to make a point by only speaking Polish to her.  Imagine my mom, going to school in English, and coming from a home that was the United Nations stand off.

My mom doesn't quite GET this blog idea .... or she doesn't read it even though I signed her up to get emails every time one was published.  I think she either files it away in her INBOX, or files it away in her mind in the same category as Linked In (she drilled me on LI because someone sent her an invitation who wasn't me, and she wanted to know why she would get such an invite).    She would like me to write a book, so maybe she just imagines it as having happened because of the blog.  The fact that I don't get paid for writing is just "a matter of time".

Back to the original blog idea, or theme.  I went to Polyvore so I could create outfits that Sally Field's character, Doris, would wear.  Enough said, you have to watch the movie to get what I'm saying.  

To give you a hand, I am sharing insights and reviews for the movie to help you get into the mood:


A self-help seminar inspires a sixty-something woman to romantically pursue her younger co-worker.

When Doris Miller (Sally Field) meets John Fremont (Max Greenfield), her company’s hip new art director, sparks fly—at least for Doris. Her first encounter with true romance (outside of the pages of a novel) convinces Doris that she and the mostly unaware John are meant for each other. In the cluttered house she shared with her late mother, Doris mines the Internet for information on her one-and-only, guided by the 13-year-old granddaughter of her best pal Roz (Tyne Daly). When Doris begins showing up at John’s regular haunts, she wins over his Williamsburg friends with her eclectic vintage wardrobe, quirky naiveté and unironic enthusiasm for their rooftop knitting circle. Her new life brings Doris a thrilling perspective, but also creates a rift between her and her longtime friends and family, who believe she’s making a fool of herself over a guy half her age. Eager for all the experiences she has missed out on, Doris throws caution to the wind and follows her heart for the very first time.

Indirection can be a beautiful tool in comedy and so it is in “Hello, My Name Is Doris,” which uses this funny, outwardly ridiculous character to tell a simple story about a love that rarely speaks its name, including in movies: that of an older woman for a much younger man.
Despite some bumpy tonal shifts and inconsistencies of characterization, Hello, My Name Is Doris impresses as a humanely amusing and occasionally poignant dramedy.

Runtime        :    95 min
Production    :    Red Crown Productions
Genres         :    Drama, Comedy, Romance
Country        :    USA
Language     :    English

T A G S:




Halloween 2016
I like to dress up for Halloween by the rule of creating my own costume.  I'll share another favorite later on.  When you are 55, it isn't appropriate to try to wear the skimpy maid's outfit or genie idea, that so many young gals do, and we did, or some did anyhow.

You can have a lot of fun dressing up as Doris.  We all have met a Doris.  They say it meant she didn't want to grow up.  My take was a little different.  I see people all the time, dressed in a time warp.  Forgetting that 1974 was 42 years ago, but steadfast in representing that era.  You get what I mean.  It is beyond honoring great time stamps, like a lot of the Millennials love anything to do with the 80s.

There are people that are stuck in a fashion bubble that only they can see the lightness of it.  Most others consider it eccentricity or poor fashion imagination to do so.  But if you ever notice, it never seems to bother the person who stays in the fashion lane that works for them, they want to stay in, or just refuse to change their style.

Doris wasn't just stuck in a fashion bubble, her whole life was one.  She had loyally stayed home to care for her parents, as an only child, while bypassing the normal life experiences others take for granted.

Sally Field's character begins her journey after the passing of the last person she was caregiver  for.  It is a fun twist on a classic time travel theme.  Except, in this case, she doesn't bump her head and her last memory is the 1970s.  Nor does she do any time travel, like "Back to the Future" embrace of the 80s.

Doris just is Doris.  Free from the confines of being a caregiver, she starts building awareness that girls would normally experience in their teens.  That is the charm of the movie.  Doris starts liking a boy.  She struggles trying to read the signs:  does he like her or doesn't he?  To help her along is her friends teenage daughter.  She goes on a dating site.  She gets all got up for a date.  The imagination is just endless, but the movie keeps it on track and tightly wound into a great theme.  Innocence and naivety can be found among many of all ages.

If I haven't convinced you to watch the movie yet, then here is a trailer you can see if it warms your heart and twists your thumbs to rent it ON DEMAND for a cheap $5 date night with yourself, a daughter, a friend.  More, if you decide to share a bottle of wine.  It is a fun idea for a girls get together that doesn't involve looking at catalogs and buying stuff you don't need.  Don't you dare minus the snacks, that is the reason most women go to house parties.  Free munchies, flowing wine, and gabbing.  

If you have followed me this far.  Thank you.  I hope you will feel rewarded.  I'm going to share the following fashion statements of Doris to get you into the spirit of this adventure together in the "Doris Gallery of Fashion" aka Doris Would on Pinterest 

Hair style:
Requires a wig attachment of some sort to the top frontal part of the head.  It is then wound by a rectangular silk-ish scarf wrapped to the top and tied with a bow.  Doris takes the time to wear her natural bangs to bed with curlers to enable her to create the wispy flocks of hair hugging her face.

Doris has a massive assortment of scarves.  The best ones being floral and rectangular to create the top knot bow identity statement.  They rarely match the outfit, mostly clash patterns, colors ... with the exception that the scarf pulls out the smallest of color in a flower on her blouse that seems to work together.

With substance:
are what I think of as the cat eye glasses.   A small dose of a nerd with rhinestones to lend to the theory that Doris is a fashionista.  (Note:  you can find these special type of glasses in Halloween shops, costume boutiques or Thrift Stores.) 

is always there.  Your traditional frosted pink eyelid, with a light brown eyeliner kohl.  Mascara, but not too heavy handed.  Don't be tempted with fake eyelashes, it's not part of her innocence.

Doris likes her jewelry to have some pizazz.  Except for the small pearl earrings, she wears dangling ones most of the time.  Then in the tradition of the 70s, a big chunky necklace, that somehow has found a friend in a color or floral theme to make it her own, again.

Shoes hues
are never shown.  We just have to use our imagination that they style is a traditional with a twist flare to them.   Shoes and purses aren't part of the fashion ensemble I would remember, but it would seem to be that it would have to seem practical with a sprinkle of glitz.

Style sense
and sensibleness seem to merge as one.  Often a floral dress with the practical sweater overlay portraying demureness with flare.

Get the hang of it
here, online.  You can come and ask to join a new Group on Polyvore I created called "Hello, my name is Doris" to submit your wonderfully imaginative creations of what Doris would wear if you were her stylist.    Once created, you can post on my "Hello, my name is Doris" board on Pinterest.  Ask to be invited if technology intervenes.

Sally Field
I snagged a few interviews with Sally Field about her role "Doris":

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

Keep calm and color on

This blog was originally written and shared on my Business, Sales, Leadership, Social Media Blog optioneerJM which I had started in May 2010.  I branched out to Meanderings because there are many issues I want to write about that don't fall under business. 

What is the most powerful, impactful trend right now?   Coloring! What? .... isn't coloring something you did when you were a kid?  Well, perhaps you did.  Now you have permission to do it as an adult because it is great for you!
The next time you are planning an important corporate event, team meeting, or training session consider adding color to your tools of engagement.  You may realize many benefits:

  • To ward off distractions
  • As an approach to problem solving
  • To improve and enhance the physical, mental and emotional well-being of individuals of all ages, all levels within the organization 
  • Artistic self-expression helps people to resolve conflicts and problems
  • Develop and improve interpersonal skills
  • Manage behavior,
  • Reduce stress,
  • Increase self-esteem
  • Build self-awareness
  • Achieve insight

Coloring and art have been around for ages.     Today,  use it as a powerful stress buster.  Assembled are helpful meanings to get started:


 Mandalas are sacred circles that have been long been used to facilitate meditation in the Indian and Tibetan religions.  

They are created and looked at to center the body and mind.  Mandelas are variations or symbols of circles often found in halos, prayer wheels, religions, architecture and nature.    Now, they are used as a healing tool and a form of meditation which suggest they can boost the immune system, reduce stress, combat depression, reduce pain, lower blood pressure and  stimulate the release of melatonin, a hormone believed to slow cell aging and promote sleep.


The word "tattoo" was brought to Europe by explorer James Cook when he returned in 1771 from his first voyage to Tahiti and New Zealand.   (In his narrative of the voyage, he referred to "tattaw". )

Popularity has steadily risen where artists, executives, and mainstream every day people swarm to "tattoo shops", "tattoo studios", or "tattoo parlors" to undergo their own personalized stamp of creativity.  Today, tattoo enthusiasts refer to tattoos as:

  • ink
  • skin art
  • tattoo art
  • tats

Coloring books:

Paint books and coloring books emerged in the United States as part of the "democratization of art" process.  The McLoughlin Brothers are credited as the inventors of the coloring book with The Little Folks' Painting Book.  
Another pioneer in the genre was Richard Outcault who authored  Buster's Paint Book in 1907.   It launched a trend to use coloring books to advertise a wide variety of products, including coffee and pianos.

 Until the 1930s, books were designed with the intent for them to be painted instead of colored.  Coloring books are widely used in schooling for young children because they tend to be more interested in coloring than other learning methods.  Pictures are also more memorable than simply words.

Educators conclude that all, regardless of background, students benefit from art as a means of enhancing their conceptual understanding of the tangible, developing their cognitive abilities, improving skills, finding a profession, as well as for spiritual edification.

Color therapy:

Color as a holistic therapy dates back thousands of years.  Color gains energy from light and why it is used as Color Therapy.  It can have a major healing impact on us as humans.
Color Therapy is a complementary therapy for which there is evidence dating back thousands of years to the ancient cultures of Egypt, China and India. Color is simply light of varying wavelengths, thus each color has its own particular wavelength and energy.  It can have a major healing impact on us as humans. 

Art Therapy:

Alternatively,  art therapy is a relatively young therapeutic discipline.  It began in the use of the arts in the moral treatment of psychiatric patients in the late 18th century.  It arose out of  a non-conformist religious tradition,  arising in English-speaking and European countries. The early art therapists who published accounts of their work acknowledged the influence of aesthetics, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, rehabilitation, early childhood education, and art education, to varying degrees, on their practices. 

 A British artist named Adrian Hill came up with the name  art therapy in 1942 while he was recovering from tuberculosis in a sanatorium.  Hill caught on to the therapeutic benefits of drawing and painting while convalescing.  He wrote that the value of art therapy lay in "completely engrossing the mind (as well as the fingers)…releasing the creative energy of the frequently inhibited patient", which enabled the patient to "build up a strong defense against his misfortunes". He suggested artistic work to his fellow patients. That began his art therapy work, which he authored a book "Art versus illness." in 1945.

Another key figure, artist Edward Adamson, became the "father of art therapy in Britain" after he was demobilised after World War II.  He helped Hill extend work in long stay mental hospitals.  Margaret Naumburg and Edith Kramer are credited for being art therapy pioneers in the United States.  

Best Sellers:

Currently, the top sellers on are the featured adult coloring books:

Our lives become busier with each passing day and as technology escalates so do our access to work, obligations and stress. Coloring allows adults a way to slow down, feel calm and use meditative coloring for relaxation.

Unleash your creative spirit with this sophisticated anti-stress colouring, doodling and drawing book. The flowing lines, sweeping swirls and highly-detailed patterns on every illustration have been created so that anyone and everyone can enjoy making something beautiful and calming. Increasing focus through creativity can benefit those who find it difficult to unwind or struggle to find their inner artist when faced with a blank page. There are no instructions, no rights or wrongs, and no need for expensive art supplies - readers can simply doodle and colour in any way they wish to create unique and exquisite pieces.

Art therapy provide healing and growth experiences, and stimulate creativity.  Creating art images is a safe and natural way of communicating feelings and experiences.  People are able to see themselves more clearly, gain different perspectives, and unblock feelings and issues that may otherwise be difficult to bring to the conscious.  We have an energy language in our body that informs us both literally and symbolically.  Immune system neuropeptides transform thoughts into matter, storing emotions and memories in body tissues.  These stored negative experiences, relationship issues and belief systems generate negative energy that affects our health.  The rational and censoring left brain can keep us from this information.  Through meditative aspects inherent in the art therapy process, we tap into the right brain, connecting to symbols, images and perceptions that speak to us from the unconscious. These images may both surprise and inform us.  The act of externalizing images releases repressed memories, stimulates our parasympathetic nervous system to calm us, and the images become our teacher.  By connecting our conscious with our unconscious we gain a more congruent sense of self, improving mind, body and spirit.

Color on

Try it and see if it improves your mood, helps you concentrate, reduces pain, or eliminates stress.  How about improve the morale and retention at your next corporate event?   I've assembled a "Color me Doodle" board on Pinterest along with some of my favorites here for you to help yourself to.